Shopping cart

Your shopping cart is empty.

bellows

Christmas Bellows Video

Your rating: None (1 vote)

Thank you to #1Niece Meredith who sent through this video she took of the Christmas display at Harrods London.
I was commissioned by John Nolan Studios to produce the bellows, a small part of what looks like a fantastic display - We'll have to go down to London before Christmas and take a proper look! There are a few more details about the project here

Thank you to #1Niece Meredith who sent through this video she took of the Christmas display at Harrods London.
I was commissioned by John Nolan Studios to produce the bellows, a small part of what looks like a fantastic display - We'll have to go down to London before Christmas and take a proper look! There are a few more details about the project here

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Big Bellows in Harrods!

Your rating: None (2 votes)

Late last month I was contacted about an unusual commission. Could I create a pair of 600mm x 600mm vinyl or leather bellows for a shop window display. After some back and forth discussion about the specs and the really tight timetable we agreed terms and I went ahead with the project, the recent bellows projects on this site such as this and this are spin-offs from development work for this commission. As it turns out, the shop was Harrods in London and the shop display is for Burberry! #1Niece Meredith works in London and she was kind enough to go round and take photos of the finished display. Thanks Meredith!

The display itself looks amazing, we'll have to take a trip down to London before Christmas to take a look. It is created by John Nolan Studios, check out their website and especially check out their show reel at the bottom of the home page, it is spectacular.


Constructing the Bellows.

The twelve sided bellows are made from white vinyl. The triangular sections are stiffened using pre-cut cardboard triangles.


I stuck these onto strips of double sided tape then trimmed them down to size.


I arranged the triangles on the back of the vinyl and stuck them into place.


Once done I rolled the whole thing round into a tube and stuck down again with double sided tape.


Here is one of the finished bellows folded up with cat for scale.


And here they are in position. Looking good! Thanks for the photos Meredith!

Late last month I was contacted about an unusual commission. Could I create a pair of 600mm x 600mm vinyl or leather bellows for a shop window display. After some back and forth discussion about the specs and the really tight timetable we agreed terms and I went ahead with the project, the recent bellows projects on this site such as this and this are spin-offs from development work for this commission. As it turns out, the shop was Harrods in London and the shop display is for Burberry! #1Niece Meredith works in London and she was kind enough to go round and take photos of the finished display. Thanks Meredith!

The display itself looks amazing, we'll have to take a trip down to London before Christmas to take a look. It is created by John Nolan Studios, check out their website and especially check out their show reel at the bottom of the home page, it is spectacular.


Constructing the Bellows.

The twelve sided bellows are made from white vinyl. The triangular sections are stiffened using pre-cut cardboard triangles.


I stuck these onto strips of double sided tape then trimmed them down to size.


I arranged the triangles on the back of the vinyl and stuck them into place.


Once done I rolled the whole thing round into a tube and stuck down again with double sided tape.


Here is one of the finished bellows folded up with cat for scale.


And here they are in position. Looking good! Thanks for the photos Meredith!

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Bellows and Pipes

£2.00

Your rating: None (2 votes)

As promised in the blog post about designing bellows I present here the files so you can make your own ten sided bellows.

Rather than just make a ten sided bellows, I thought I would complete the model with a pair of whistling pipes. Check out the YouTube clip below to see and hear how they work.


As always, members can download the parts for free from the link. Non-members can join in the fun for £2.00 / $3.00

The first two pages are bellows, these need to be printed onto ordinary printer paper. The third page contains the parts for the bellows ends and the pipes. Print these pages onto thin card (230 micron 67lb) I printed out the third sheet three times onto different coloured card and mixed and matched the result for a colourful model.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then carefully cut out the parts.


The five sided bellows on the first page are included for your interest and amusement. The instructions below concern the ten sided bellows and pipes.

Pre-crease all the score lines before starting, this makes folding the bellows much easier than it would be otherwise.


Roll round and glue down the tube taking care to line up the edges as accurately as possible.


Fold down the first layer of the bellows.


Work your way down the bellows folding one layer at a time.


Keep going to the bottom of the bellows.


The ends of the bellows are made from double thickness card. Fold them over, glue them down. Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out and cut out the two holes in the top piece.


Fold up and glue the pipe bodies. Fold as accurately as possible and make sure all the joints are sealed with glue.


Assemble the top covers.


Glue the covers to the matching pipes. Line up the crease in the cover with the bottom of the pipe and line up the front edge of the cover with the edge of the glue area. While the glue joint is still movable blow through the bottom to make sure that the whistle is working.


The two completed whistles.


Glue the base to the bellows.


Prepare the pipe with a little more glue than you would normally use for an air-tight seal. Make sure you have sealed the grooves with glue.


Press the pipes down so that the holes are lined up with the holes in the top.


The pipes in position.


Glue the bellows top to the bellows to complete the model.

Push down to sound the bellows, the natural spring of the paper will re-inflate the bellows ready for the next whistle.

As promised in the blog post about designing bellows I present here the files so you can make your own ten sided bellows.

Rather than just make a ten sided bellows, I thought I would complete the model with a pair of whistling pipes. Check out the YouTube clip below to see and hear how they work.


As always, members can download the parts for free from the link. Non-members can join in the fun for £2.00 / $3.00

The first two pages are bellows, these need to be printed onto ordinary printer paper. The third page contains the parts for the bellows ends and the pipes. Print these pages onto thin card (230 micron 67lb) I printed out the third sheet three times onto different coloured card and mixed and matched the result for a colourful model.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then carefully cut out the parts.


The five sided bellows on the first page are included for your interest and amusement. The instructions below concern the ten sided bellows and pipes.

Pre-crease all the score lines before starting, this makes folding the bellows much easier than it would be otherwise.


Roll round and glue down the tube taking care to line up the edges as accurately as possible.


Fold down the first layer of the bellows.


Work your way down the bellows folding one layer at a time.


Keep going to the bottom of the bellows.


The ends of the bellows are made from double thickness card. Fold them over, glue them down. Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out and cut out the two holes in the top piece.


Fold up and glue the pipe bodies. Fold as accurately as possible and make sure all the joints are sealed with glue.


Assemble the top covers.


Glue the covers to the matching pipes. Line up the crease in the cover with the bottom of the pipe and line up the front edge of the cover with the edge of the glue area. While the glue joint is still movable blow through the bottom to make sure that the whistle is working.


The two completed whistles.


Glue the base to the bellows.


Prepare the pipe with a little more glue than you would normally use for an air-tight seal. Make sure you have sealed the grooves with glue.


Press the pipes down so that the holes are lined up with the holes in the top.


The pipes in position.


Glue the bellows top to the bellows to complete the model.

Push down to sound the bellows, the natural spring of the paper will re-inflate the bellows ready for the next whistle.

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Designing Bellows

Your rating: None (2 votes)

If you follow my Instagram feed you will have noticed a few pictures of bellows of late. This is related to a commission piece I recently completed (More of which I'll be able to tell you in early Nov) For now, I'm happy to share with you what I have learned about bellows design. There are a few ways of making bellows, the one I'm using here is based around triangles. In the picture below I've marked out the base triangle of a five sided bellows.


Here's the base triangle for a ten sided bellows. You can see how it is constructed from three adjacent corners on a decagon.


To construct the net for the bellows I places a pair of these same triangles back to back and measured them up. I then used the dimensions to create a grid of triangles in Illustrator.


The grid features the same triangle repeated and stacked.


Here's the completed layout for the ten sided bellows. (Note that the bellows are rotated ninety degrees compared to the previous picture.


Printed, scored and folded, the finished result looks like this. I'll make it available as a download shortly. Meanwhile if you have any questions please feel free to ask them in the comments section.

If you follow my Instagram feed you will have noticed a few pictures of bellows of late. This is related to a commission piece I recently completed (More of which I'll be able to tell you in early Nov) For now, I'm happy to share with you what I have learned about bellows design. There are a few ways of making bellows, the one I'm using here is based around triangles. In the picture below I've marked out the base triangle of a five sided bellows.


Here's the base triangle for a ten sided bellows. You can see how it is constructed from three adjacent corners on a decagon.


To construct the net for the bellows I places a pair of these same triangles back to back and measured them up. I then used the dimensions to create a grid of triangles in Illustrator.


The grid features the same triangle repeated and stacked.


Here's the completed layout for the ten sided bellows. (Note that the bellows are rotated ninety degrees compared to the previous picture.


Printed, scored and folded, the finished result looks like this. I'll make it available as a download shortly. Meanwhile if you have any questions please feel free to ask them in the comments section.

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Paper Puffer

£0.00

Your rating: None (8 votes)

Paper Puffer! Use the paper puffer to clear eraser-dust from your sketch book or for cleaning your camera lenses or a thousand and one other uses requiring you to remove dust form a surface without touching it. Made entirely from paper this hand held air blower is the perfect addition to any artists tool kit. This project is available for everyone to download for free.

If you enjoy this model, check out the robives.com membership. As a member you can download all the hundreds of other projects on the site for free!


Download the file to your computer and open it. Print out the first page onto thin card. (230 micron / 67lb) I used coloured card for a colourful model.

Print out the second page onto normal printer paper.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then carefully cut out the parts.



Making the bellows is the tricky part. Lets get this out of the way! Pre-crease all the dotted and dashed lines before you start assembly.


Roll the bellows round a suitably sized plastic bottle with the tabs at the ends. Glue the bellows into a tube carefully lining up the end.


Starting from one end work your way round folding down one layer at a time.


Keep going one layer as a time...


...all the way down...


...until the bellows are folded. Well done!


The rest is easy :-) Fold round and glue down the nozzle.


Fold over the handle piece as shown to make double thickness card.


Fold over the two ends to make double thickness card. Set aside until the glue is dry.


Cut out the two ends as shown.


Cut out the handle and glue it into place on the back piece.


Glue the nozzle into the front piece as shown.


Glue the bellows to the front piece.


Finish off the puffer by gluing on the rear piece.


Pump the bellows to blow away any unwanted dust!

Download: 
puffer.pdf (1.67 MB)

Paper Puffer! Use the paper puffer to clear eraser-dust from your sketch book or for cleaning your camera lenses or a thousand and one other uses requiring you to remove dust form a surface without touching it. Made entirely from paper this hand held air blower is the perfect addition to any artists tool kit. This project is available for everyone to download for free.

If you enjoy this model, check out the robives.com membership. As a member you can download all the hundreds of other projects on the site for free!


Download the file to your computer and open it. Print out the first page onto thin card. (230 micron / 67lb) I used coloured card for a colourful model.

Print out the second page onto normal printer paper.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then carefully cut out the parts.



Making the bellows is the tricky part. Lets get this out of the way! Pre-crease all the dotted and dashed lines before you start assembly.


Roll the bellows round a suitably sized plastic bottle with the tabs at the ends. Glue the bellows into a tube carefully lining up the end.


Starting from one end work your way round folding down one layer at a time.


Keep going one layer as a time...


...all the way down...


...until the bellows are folded. Well done!


The rest is easy :-) Fold round and glue down the nozzle.


Fold over the handle piece as shown to make double thickness card.


Fold over the two ends to make double thickness card. Set aside until the glue is dry.


Cut out the two ends as shown.


Cut out the handle and glue it into place on the back piece.


Glue the nozzle into the front piece as shown.


Glue the bellows to the front piece.


Finish off the puffer by gluing on the rear piece.


Pump the bellows to blow away any unwanted dust!

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Twitterer Type 3

£2.50

Your rating: None (3 votes)

Twitterer Type 3

In the previous blog post I showed a design for a crank driven bellows to be used at the heart of a bird box project. I have taken that basic design and made it more sturdy. I liked the way the bellows in the previous model were completely visible so I've fitted the crank to the inside of a box but kept the bellows on a pair of slide rails outside the box. You can see the result in animated action on Instagram by clicking the picture to the left.

If you are a Member or a Patron you can download the parts for free, thanks for your support! Non members can join in the fun for a small fee.


The first page of the file needs to be printed onto normal printer paper. The remaining pages need to be printed onto thin card (230gsm / 67lb) I used coloured paper and card for a colourful model. Score the dotted and dashed lines. Cut out the holes then carefully cut out the parts.


The push rod ends are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down. Once the glue is dry cut out the hole and cut out the parts,


Assemble the push rod and glue the push rod ends into place.


Roll up and glue down the three axle tubes.


Fit the shortest axle tube into the push rod.

Make up the two crank pieces.


Glue the crank pieces to the axle. Leave a small gap between the crank pieces and the push rod so that it remains free to turn.


Fold up and glue the flaps on the box pieces making triangular tube sections.


Assemble the sliders.


Glue the slider to the glue area on the box side making sure that the holes are lined up accurately. The large arrow in the glue area points up to the top of the slider.


Glue together the two box sides. Glue down the top flaps on the box but not the base flaps.


Assemble the handle as shown.


Make up the bellows top and base by gluing down the card to make double thickness.


Glue together the two parts of the cross piece.


Thread the crank into position and glue in the two remaining axle pieces.


Glue down the base flaps then glue the side flaps to the inside of the box.


Make up the two sleeves.


Thread the sleeves into position.


Glue in the cross piece keeping it as square as possible.


Turn the model over and glue the push rod tab to one side of the crosspiece inner.


Glue the handle into position.


Make up the pipe body and pipe end.


Glue the two parts of the pipe together lining up the end with the glue area on the body. Blow through the pipe to make sure it works. Make small adjustments to the position of the pipe end if necessary before the glue dries.


Glue the pipe to the bellows top plate lining it up over the hole.


Before starting the bellows pre-crease as many of the folds as possible. Roll round and glue down the paper to make a tube.

Starting from one end fold down one row at a time observing the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


Glue the bellows end plate to the tabs on one end of the bellows.


Glue the other end of the bellows to the bellows end plate with the pipe.


Once the glue is dry glue the tabs on the bellows end place to the inside top of the sliders.

Let the glue dry then glue the bottom of the bellows to cross piece to complete the model. Let the glue dry completely


Turn the handle and fill the room with a keening whistle!

Twitterer Type 3

In the previous blog post I showed a design for a crank driven bellows to be used at the heart of a bird box project. I have taken that basic design and made it more sturdy. I liked the way the bellows in the previous model were completely visible so I've fitted the crank to the inside of a box but kept the bellows on a pair of slide rails outside the box. You can see the result in animated action on Instagram by clicking the picture to the left.

If you are a Member or a Patron you can download the parts for free, thanks for your support! Non members can join in the fun for a small fee.


The first page of the file needs to be printed onto normal printer paper. The remaining pages need to be printed onto thin card (230gsm / 67lb) I used coloured paper and card for a colourful model. Score the dotted and dashed lines. Cut out the holes then carefully cut out the parts.


The push rod ends are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down. Once the glue is dry cut out the hole and cut out the parts,


Assemble the push rod and glue the push rod ends into place.


Roll up and glue down the three axle tubes.


Fit the shortest axle tube into the push rod.

Make up the two crank pieces.


Glue the crank pieces to the axle. Leave a small gap between the crank pieces and the push rod so that it remains free to turn.


Fold up and glue the flaps on the box pieces making triangular tube sections.


Assemble the sliders.


Glue the slider to the glue area on the box side making sure that the holes are lined up accurately. The large arrow in the glue area points up to the top of the slider.


Glue together the two box sides. Glue down the top flaps on the box but not the base flaps.


Assemble the handle as shown.


Make up the bellows top and base by gluing down the card to make double thickness.


Glue together the two parts of the cross piece.


Thread the crank into position and glue in the two remaining axle pieces.


Glue down the base flaps then glue the side flaps to the inside of the box.


Make up the two sleeves.


Thread the sleeves into position.


Glue in the cross piece keeping it as square as possible.


Turn the model over and glue the push rod tab to one side of the crosspiece inner.


Glue the handle into position.


Make up the pipe body and pipe end.


Glue the two parts of the pipe together lining up the end with the glue area on the body. Blow through the pipe to make sure it works. Make small adjustments to the position of the pipe end if necessary before the glue dries.


Glue the pipe to the bellows top plate lining it up over the hole.


Before starting the bellows pre-crease as many of the folds as possible. Roll round and glue down the paper to make a tube.

Starting from one end fold down one row at a time observing the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


Glue the bellows end plate to the tabs on one end of the bellows.


Glue the other end of the bellows to the bellows end plate with the pipe.


Once the glue is dry glue the tabs on the bellows end place to the inside top of the sliders.

Let the glue dry then glue the bottom of the bellows to cross piece to complete the model. Let the glue dry completely


Turn the handle and fill the room with a keening whistle!

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Two Bellows

Your rating: None (4 votes)

£2.00

The bellows part of the Bird Box Project have caused me some difficulties. The problem was that as the bellows are compressed they twist. This made it difficult to mount them inside a mechanism. I've come up with a solution to the problem which I outlined in my previous blog post.

I'm now making both the new and the original designs available as a download so you can try them out first hand. Click on the image (left) to see and hear both types of bellows in action.

If you are a member or a patron you can download the parts for free. Thanks for your support! Non-members can also join in for a small fee.

Print out the first two pages onto standard printer paper. The third page has the parts for the end plates and the pipes. These need to be printed onto thin card (230gsm 67lb) You will need to print this page out twice to make both models. I printed it onto two different colours of card then mixed and matched the parts to make colourful models. For both the paper and the card score along the dotted and dashed lines, cut out the holes then carefully cut out the parts.

 


Making The Pipes

You need a pipe for each model. Fold round and glue the pipe body.


Fold and glue the pipe cover.


Glue the pipe cover to the pipe body lining it up with the grey areas.


Two pipes ready for action.


Bellows: Original Design

Before making the bellows pre crease along the fold lines.


Form the bellows tube by rolling it round a suitable size bottle and glue down the end as accurately as possible.


Start from one end. Working down a row at a time crease the bellows following the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


The end pieces are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down. Cut out the marked hole on the top piece.


Glue the ends into place on the tabs on the bellows.


Glue the pipe into position over the hole. Let the glue dry completely before trying out your bellows.


Bellows: New Design

The design works in the same way as the original design but every other row of creases is flipped left to right. This cancels out the rotation and makes the bellow's movement parallel. Try to pre-crease all the fold lines, it is harder than on the other design but worth the effort.


Form the bellows by rolling the paper round a suitable bottle and gluing the ends down as accurately as possible.


Start from one end. Work your way down one row at as time creasing the bellows by following the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


Glue the end pieces into place.


Glue the pipe into place over the hole. Wait until the glue is completely dry before you try out your bellows, you don't want to blow off the pipe!


Seen below are both types of completed bellows.

My next step will be to mount the new design bellows into some type of crank mechanism. Should be fun!

The bellows part of the Bird Box Project have caused me some difficulties. The problem was that as the bellows are compressed they twist. This made it difficult to mount them inside a mechanism. I've come up with a solution to the problem which I outlined in my previous blog post.

I'm now making both the new and the original designs available as a download so you can try them out first hand. Click on the image (left) to see and hear both types of bellows in action.

If you are a member or a patron you can download the parts for free. Thanks for your support! Non-members can also join in for a small fee.

Print out the first two pages onto standard printer paper. The third page has the parts for the end plates and the pipes. These need to be printed onto thin card (230gsm 67lb) You will need to print this page out twice to make both models. I printed it onto two different colours of card then mixed and matched the parts to make colourful models. For both the paper and the card score along the dotted and dashed lines, cut out the holes then carefully cut out the parts.

 


Making The Pipes

You need a pipe for each model. Fold round and glue the pipe body.


Fold and glue the pipe cover.


Glue the pipe cover to the pipe body lining it up with the grey areas.


Two pipes ready for action.


Bellows: Original Design

Before making the bellows pre crease along the fold lines.


Form the bellows tube by rolling it round a suitable size bottle and glue down the end as accurately as possible.


Start from one end. Working down a row at a time crease the bellows following the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


The end pieces are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down. Cut out the marked hole on the top piece.


Glue the ends into place on the tabs on the bellows.


Glue the pipe into position over the hole. Let the glue dry completely before trying out your bellows.


Bellows: New Design

The design works in the same way as the original design but every other row of creases is flipped left to right. This cancels out the rotation and makes the bellow's movement parallel. Try to pre-crease all the fold lines, it is harder than on the other design but worth the effort.


Form the bellows by rolling the paper round a suitable bottle and gluing the ends down as accurately as possible.


Start from one end. Work your way down one row at as time creasing the bellows by following the hill and valley folds marked on the paper.


Glue the end pieces into place.


Glue the pipe into place over the hole. Wait until the glue is completely dry before you try out your bellows, you don't want to blow off the pipe!


Seen below are both types of completed bellows.

My next step will be to mount the new design bellows into some type of crank mechanism. Should be fun!

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Bellows Design - Problems and Solution.

Your rating: None (4 votes)

Next step in the bird box project. Bellows and crank. Turn the handle to pump the bellows. This is similar to the type three model I made before but the guide rails will keep the moving plate horizontal as it moves. There's a problem though.

As the bellows move back and forth the plates twist in relationship with each other.

 

This is the net for a section of the current bellows design.

My thought was that if I flip every other row side to side, the rotation in the end plates should be canceled out.

Here's the new layout.

It takes a little long to score the bellows but the end result works perfectly. No rotation at all!

 

Here are the two test bellows side by side. Next step - connecting up the crank.

Next step in the bird box project. Bellows and crank. Turn the handle to pump the bellows. This is similar to the type three model I made before but the guide rails will keep the moving plate horizontal as it moves. There's a problem though.

As the bellows move back and forth the plates twist in relationship with each other.

 

This is the net for a section of the current bellows design.

My thought was that if I flip every other row side to side, the rotation in the end plates should be canceled out.

Here's the new layout.

It takes a little long to score the bellows but the end result works perfectly. No rotation at all!

 

Here are the two test bellows side by side. Next step - connecting up the crank.

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Further Bird Box Experiments

Your rating: None (3 votes)

Further experiments on the Bird Box project. This time, a crank with a big throw (70mm between the extremes) driving a higher volume bellows. You can click on the picture to see a quick Instagram video clip with sound of the first draft.

 

I had fun folding up the bellows. Starting with a modified version of the bellows from the squeeze box project I've made an Instagram video of me folding up the bellows at super speed.


Everything fits together quite nicely, the box will need to be slightly wider and deeper as the top plate of the bellows catches on the inner walls but apart from that, it is looking good.


My next plan was to try changing the pitch as the bellows move. Fitting a plunger into the tube of the pipe should let me change the pitch of the pipe in the same way that a Swanee whistle works. A loose fitting plunger seems to work well and over comes the problems I had had before of tight tolerances. My initial plan had been to use the main crank to move the plunger in and out via a bell crank. After a bit of thought though, I think a cam might be a better idea.


If I can add enough weight to the plunger so that it drops under gravity into the pipe tube I should be able to make it move up and down with a cam. As the plunger moves the pitch of the note changes. Hopefully I will be able to simulate some birdsong.

Further experiments on the Bird Box project. This time, a crank with a big throw (70mm between the extremes) driving a higher volume bellows. You can click on the picture to see a quick Instagram video clip with sound of the first draft.

 

I had fun folding up the bellows. Starting with a modified version of the bellows from the squeeze box project I've made an Instagram video of me folding up the bellows at super speed.


Everything fits together quite nicely, the box will need to be slightly wider and deeper as the top plate of the bellows catches on the inner walls but apart from that, it is looking good.


My next plan was to try changing the pitch as the bellows move. Fitting a plunger into the tube of the pipe should let me change the pitch of the pipe in the same way that a Swanee whistle works. A loose fitting plunger seems to work well and over comes the problems I had had before of tight tolerances. My initial plan had been to use the main crank to move the plunger in and out via a bell crank. After a bit of thought though, I think a cam might be a better idea.


If I can add enough weight to the plunger so that it drops under gravity into the pipe tube I should be able to make it move up and down with a cam. As the plunger moves the pitch of the note changes. Hopefully I will be able to simulate some birdsong.

Log in or register to post review
< | >

Twitterer - Alternative Layout

Your rating: None (3 votes)

I'm trying out a few different mechanisms for my bird box project.

Rather than experimenting with several designs and then just posting one as a download I thought you might be interested to try out the various designs yourself and join in the fun!

Here's the second layout of a two pipe twitterer. The volume of the bellows is much greater than the previous version so the sound is much clearer. I'll be releasing this one and the previous double bellows project as downloadable kits in the next few days.


This version has a fixed 'V' shape outer with a moving centre piece which, when moved up and down, blows first one pipe then the other. I should be able to link this centre piece to the birds beak to make an animated bird model.


From this angle you can see both pipes, each pipe is tuned to a different note.


I envisage fitting the bird here on the side of the bellows unit.

 

I'm trying out a few different mechanisms for my bird box project.

Rather than experimenting with several designs and then just posting one as a download I thought you might be interested to try out the various designs yourself and join in the fun!

Here's the second layout of a two pipe twitterer. The volume of the bellows is much greater than the previous version so the sound is much clearer. I'll be releasing this one and the previous double bellows project as downloadable kits in the next few days.


This version has a fixed 'V' shape outer with a moving centre piece which, when moved up and down, blows first one pipe then the other. I should be able to link this centre piece to the birds beak to make an animated bird model.


From this angle you can see both pipes, each pipe is tuned to a different note.


I envisage fitting the bird here on the side of the bellows unit.

 

Log in or register to post review
< | >