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Mouse Machine

£2.50

Your rating: None (5 votes)

Mouse Machine, a paper animation kit to download and make. Turn the handle and mouse cranks his handle; or is it the other way round? Either way, members and patrons can download the model for free at the link. Non-members can join in the fun for $3.75/£2.50


Print out the parts onto thin card (230 micron / 67lb) Score along the dotted and dashed lines, cut out the holes then carefully cut out the pieces.


Several of the pieces are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down before carefully cutting them out.

Start by making the gears from double thickness card.


The arms need the hands inserting before they are glued down.


Once the glue is dry, cut them out.


Roll up the various tubes and glue them down lining up the edges carefully.


Glue one of the pinion axle tubes into the square pinion axle.


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Fit the pinion to the handle lining the edges of the tabs with the end of the handle.


Glue the other pinion axle tube into place


Fit the axle stub into the gear. Fit the gear axle inner into the axle stub so that it protrudes roughly 5mm from the other side of the gear.


Make up the crank.


Make the base using right angled triangle tubes as shown.


Make up the gear cover as shown.


Glue the two box halves together as shown.


Thread the axle into position through the hole in the box side.


Thread the pinion assembly through the other side hole and into the axle tube. A small dot of glue will secure it into position.


Found the box round and glue it down. Leave the top open for now.


Glue the base onto the tab numbered 1.


Fold the base up and glue it to the number 2 tab.

Glue the box lid down.


Glue the gear cover tab to the marked area on the base.


Thread the gear into position.


Lift up the gear cover and fit it into place.


Glue on the crank and the mouse handle.


Thread the mouse handle outer into position. No glue! It must be free to rotate. That completes the machine part.


Making the Mouse

Curve round the glue the body. Glue the two shoulder tubes into position.


Glue the feet to the legs. Make sure the two slots in the top of the legs (arrowed) are facing each other as shown.


Make up the leg hinge by folding over the flaps and gluing them down.


Fit the hinge into position.


Fit the body to the two tabs on the legs hinge. The body should be free to flex back and forth at the hips.


Glue the arms to the shoulders. The hands should be close together as shown.


Roll round the head to make a cone as shown.


Glue the ears into the inside of the head.


Glue the neck to the neck end then glue the neck to the inside back of the head.


Fit the head into the body. Glue the hands to the mouse handle outer.


Thread the mouse handle outer back into place on the mouse handle then glue the feet to the base.


Finish off the model by gluing on the tail.


Turn the handle to crank the mouse, or for the mouse to turn you...

Mouse Machine, a paper animation kit to download and make. Turn the handle and mouse cranks his handle; or is it the other way round? Either way, members and patrons can download the model for free at the link. Non-members can join in the fun for $3.75/£2.50


Print out the parts onto thin card (230 micron / 67lb) Score along the dotted and dashed lines, cut out the holes then carefully cut out the pieces.


Several of the pieces are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down before carefully cutting them out.

Start by making the gears from double thickness card.


The arms need the hands inserting before they are glued down.


Once the glue is dry, cut them out.


Roll up the various tubes and glue them down lining up the edges carefully.


Glue one of the pinion axle tubes into the square pinion axle.


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Fit the pinion to the handle lining the edges of the tabs with the end of the handle.


Glue the other pinion axle tube into place


Fit the axle stub into the gear. Fit the gear axle inner into the axle stub so that it protrudes roughly 5mm from the other side of the gear.


Make up the crank.


Make the base using right angled triangle tubes as shown.


Make up the gear cover as shown.


Glue the two box halves together as shown.


Thread the axle into position through the hole in the box side.


Thread the pinion assembly through the other side hole and into the axle tube. A small dot of glue will secure it into position.


Found the box round and glue it down. Leave the top open for now.


Glue the base onto the tab numbered 1.


Fold the base up and glue it to the number 2 tab.

Glue the box lid down.


Glue the gear cover tab to the marked area on the base.


Thread the gear into position.


Lift up the gear cover and fit it into place.


Glue on the crank and the mouse handle.


Thread the mouse handle outer into position. No glue! It must be free to rotate. That completes the machine part.


Making the Mouse

Curve round the glue the body. Glue the two shoulder tubes into position.


Glue the feet to the legs. Make sure the two slots in the top of the legs (arrowed) are facing each other as shown.


Make up the leg hinge by folding over the flaps and gluing them down.


Fit the hinge into position.


Fit the body to the two tabs on the legs hinge. The body should be free to flex back and forth at the hips.


Glue the arms to the shoulders. The hands should be close together as shown.


Roll round the head to make a cone as shown.


Glue the ears into the inside of the head.


Glue the neck to the neck end then glue the neck to the inside back of the head.


Fit the head into the body. Glue the hands to the mouse handle outer.


Thread the mouse handle outer back into place on the mouse handle then glue the feet to the base.


Finish off the model by gluing on the tail.


Turn the handle to crank the mouse, or for the mouse to turn you...

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Mouse Machine Progress Report

Your rating: None (2 votes)

Having completed the mechanism for the mouse machine it was time to attach the mouse!

I mocked up a mouse adding a hinge to his waist so that he can flex back and forth. I fixed his feet to the box top and his hands to a rotating sleeve fitted over the mouse's crank.


The model works well, you can see a video on Instagram here. I made some final adjustments to make the movement more pronounced. I've extended the mouse's crank and raised it up slightly then moved the mouse back a little.


The new movement has a more exaggerated feel, like the mouse is really putting his back into the cranking!

Now that I happy with the design I'll lay out the parts and add colour.

Having completed the mechanism for the mouse machine it was time to attach the mouse!

I mocked up a mouse adding a hinge to his waist so that he can flex back and forth. I fixed his feet to the box top and his hands to a rotating sleeve fitted over the mouse's crank.


The model works well, you can see a video on Instagram here. I made some final adjustments to make the movement more pronounced. I've extended the mouse's crank and raised it up slightly then moved the mouse back a little.


The new movement has a more exaggerated feel, like the mouse is really putting his back into the cranking!

Now that I happy with the design I'll lay out the parts and add colour.

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Mouse Machine Mechanism Prototype

No votes yet

First draft of the Mouse Machine mechanism. I've put together a model as a test of the layout I sketched out earlier. The mouse will fit on the base plate and will appear to be operating the crank as the handle is turned.


There were a couple of problems with the first draft.

First, the main gear was intended to be flush with the box front but was being pushed away by the pinion gear.

Secondly I had initially made the crank and pinion as two separate parts but on completion it looked like they would be better as a single unit.


Rather than completely remake the model I employed a trick I often use when prototyping. The axle holes in the box side needed to be moved back by 3mm so I remade just the sides with the holes in the correct place, I expanded the hole in the original box, then glued the new sides into place creating a repositioned pair of axle holes.


I also make up a new handle with a longer shaft and glued the pinion to it.


With the drive axle in place I fitted a lock piece to the end opposite the pinion to stop the axle coming out then fitted the yellow horizontal handle to complete the mechanism.


With everything in place it is time to move to the next stage, making a mouse with shoulder and hip joints.

First draft of the Mouse Machine mechanism. I've put together a model as a test of the layout I sketched out earlier. The mouse will fit on the base plate and will appear to be operating the crank as the handle is turned.


There were a couple of problems with the first draft.

First, the main gear was intended to be flush with the box front but was being pushed away by the pinion gear.

Secondly I had initially made the crank and pinion as two separate parts but on completion it looked like they would be better as a single unit.


Rather than completely remake the model I employed a trick I often use when prototyping. The axle holes in the box side needed to be moved back by 3mm so I remade just the sides with the holes in the correct place, I expanded the hole in the original box, then glued the new sides into place creating a repositioned pair of axle holes.


I also make up a new handle with a longer shaft and glued the pinion to it.


With the drive axle in place I fitted a lock piece to the end opposite the pinion to stop the axle coming out then fitted the yellow horizontal handle to complete the mechanism.


With everything in place it is time to move to the next stage, making a mouse with shoulder and hip joints.

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Mouse Machine #1. Model Proposal.

Your rating: None (1 vote)

Proposal for a new animated paper model.

I'm planning a couple of models that will bring my Paper Mice to life starting with this Mouse Machine #1. There will be three Mech Gears all at 90° to each other so the layout of parts should be interesting! The flat gear will be underneath the top of the box so that the mouse will have a fixed surface to stand on. I'll then cut a couple of slots in the box top for the teeth of the other two gears to mesh through. Should be fun!

Oh - and Happy New Year everyone!

Proposal for a new animated paper model.

I'm planning a couple of models that will bring my Paper Mice to life starting with this Mouse Machine #1. There will be three Mech Gears all at 90° to each other so the layout of parts should be interesting! The flat gear will be underneath the top of the box so that the mouse will have a fixed surface to stand on. I'll then cut a couple of slots in the box top for the teeth of the other two gears to mesh through. Should be fun!

Oh - and Happy New Year everyone!

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Twitch Mouse

£2.50

Your rating: None (4 votes)

Twitch Mouse. An animated model to download and make. Turn the handle and the mouse twitches his cute little nose! Awww!


You can see the mouse in action on this YouTube clip.


Paid members can download the parts for free from the link. Thanks for signing up. If you are not a member you can join in the fun by becoming a member here or by paying £2.50 to download this kit via the shopping cart.

Download the parts and print them out onto thin card. (230gsm / 67lb) There are two version of the model. Colour and un-coloured. The coloured model is printed on both sides of the sheet. Print the front, flip the card, return it to the printer then print the back.

Score the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the pieces.


Fold round and glue the cam shaft outer.


Fold over and glue down the cam to make double thickness card. Once the glue is dry carefully cut it out.


Fit the cam to the cam shaft outer lining it up with the grey line.


Roll up and glue down the two round tubes lining up the edge with the points of the triangles.


Fold round and glue together the cam follower.


Glue the flap to the cam follower then wrap it round the short tube and glue it down.


Wrap a small coin (20mm diameter - 4gram weight) tightly in an off-cut of card.


Glue the coin in position on the cam follower.


Assemble the handle in three steps as shown.


Fold round and glue the tabs on the box tops . The triangle tubes are right angled triangles.


Fold the tabs round on the box sides and glue them down making equilateral triangle tubes.


Glue the side to the base. Note that the holes in the sides are closest to the base.


Glue the top into position and glue the box closed.


Hold the square tube in position and push the the circular tube into place. No need to use glue as friction will hold it into place.


Glue the push-rod to the cam follower.


Thread the push rod up through the hole in the box top and glue the cam follower to the front of the box.


Complete the box by gluing the handle into place.


Roll round and glue down the head of the mouse. Glue up the darts in the two ears.


Glue the front legs to the body front.


Glue the two parts of the body back together.


Glue the two pieces of the body together using the grey area for alignment.


Glue on the back legs. Glue the tail to the back of the body.


Glue the head tab to the front of the body. The mouse head will be free to nod up and down.


Turn the handle on the box so that the cam is at its lowest position. Glue the head tab to the push rod so that the head is level or slightly downward pointing.


That's it! Once the glue is dry, turn the handle and the Twitch Mouse twitches his cute little nose.

There's a block of cheese to make as well - hey, it is a mouse.

Twitch Mouse. An animated model to download and make. Turn the handle and the mouse twitches his cute little nose! Awww!


You can see the mouse in action on this YouTube clip.


Paid members can download the parts for free from the link. Thanks for signing up. If you are not a member you can join in the fun by becoming a member here or by paying £2.50 to download this kit via the shopping cart.

Download the parts and print them out onto thin card. (230gsm / 67lb) There are two version of the model. Colour and un-coloured. The coloured model is printed on both sides of the sheet. Print the front, flip the card, return it to the printer then print the back.

Score the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the pieces.


Fold round and glue the cam shaft outer.


Fold over and glue down the cam to make double thickness card. Once the glue is dry carefully cut it out.


Fit the cam to the cam shaft outer lining it up with the grey line.


Roll up and glue down the two round tubes lining up the edge with the points of the triangles.


Fold round and glue together the cam follower.


Glue the flap to the cam follower then wrap it round the short tube and glue it down.


Wrap a small coin (20mm diameter - 4gram weight) tightly in an off-cut of card.


Glue the coin in position on the cam follower.


Assemble the handle in three steps as shown.


Fold round and glue the tabs on the box tops . The triangle tubes are right angled triangles.


Fold the tabs round on the box sides and glue them down making equilateral triangle tubes.


Glue the side to the base. Note that the holes in the sides are closest to the base.


Glue the top into position and glue the box closed.


Hold the square tube in position and push the the circular tube into place. No need to use glue as friction will hold it into place.


Glue the push-rod to the cam follower.


Thread the push rod up through the hole in the box top and glue the cam follower to the front of the box.


Complete the box by gluing the handle into place.


Roll round and glue down the head of the mouse. Glue up the darts in the two ears.


Glue the front legs to the body front.


Glue the two parts of the body back together.


Glue the two pieces of the body together using the grey area for alignment.


Glue on the back legs. Glue the tail to the back of the body.


Glue the head tab to the front of the body. The mouse head will be free to nod up and down.


Turn the handle on the box so that the cam is at its lowest position. Glue the head tab to the push rod so that the head is level or slightly downward pointing.


That's it! Once the glue is dry, turn the handle and the Twitch Mouse twitches his cute little nose.

There's a block of cheese to make as well - hey, it is a mouse.

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Using Essential Mechanisms

Your rating: None (4 votes)

I'm in the process of producing a series of models that use the Essential Mechanism projects as starting points. My plan is to show how to go from a pure mechanism starting point to create a character based automaton. Some of these models will use existing paper characters from the site, some of them will be based on new characters.

The first of these will be this mouse which uses a cam box to make his nose twitch excitedly.

I'm in the process of producing a series of models that use the Essential Mechanism projects as starting points. My plan is to show how to go from a pure mechanism starting point to create a character based automaton. Some of these models will use existing paper characters from the site, some of them will be based on new characters.

The first of these will be this mouse which uses a cam box to make his nose twitch excitedly.

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Fun with a FizzBit!

Your rating: None (5 votes)

Charge up your FizzBit and turn any paper toy into a robot! Following a tipoff on Twitter I ordered and quickly received this FizzBit from @CraftyRobot. They are are super simple to use, charge them in a USB socket then release them. The pager motor on the front spins enthusiastically bringing the model to life. There are loads of free paper models on the Craft Robot site and of course you can design your own models to animate. Sounds like my sort of fun :-)


I thought I'd give the FizzBit a try by fitting one to my Paper Mouse model. I've changed the parts slightly on the original file so I'll be making the file of this updated version available for anyone who wants to join in at home.

I put together this piece to hold one end of the FizzBit.


It fits in like this.


Here I've fitted the holder into the back of a made up mouse model.


The FizzBit fits into the holder. The pointy end of the FizzBit fits into a rectangulat hole in the front of the mouse.


Flip it the right way up and set it free, watch as it whizzes round the desktop!


The cat certainlty approves!

Charge up your FizzBit and turn any paper toy into a robot! Following a tipoff on Twitter I ordered and quickly received this FizzBit from @CraftyRobot. They are are super simple to use, charge them in a USB socket then release them. The pager motor on the front spins enthusiastically bringing the model to life. There are loads of free paper models on the Craft Robot site and of course you can design your own models to animate. Sounds like my sort of fun :-)


I thought I'd give the FizzBit a try by fitting one to my Paper Mouse model. I've changed the parts slightly on the original file so I'll be making the file of this updated version available for anyone who wants to join in at home.

I put together this piece to hold one end of the FizzBit.


It fits in like this.


Here I've fitted the holder into the back of a made up mouse model.


The FizzBit fits into the holder. The pointy end of the FizzBit fits into a rectangulat hole in the front of the mouse.


Flip it the right way up and set it free, watch as it whizzes round the desktop!


The cat certainlty approves!

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Patterned Paper Projects

Your rating: None (5 votes)

Michael42er has created and entire herd of paper elephants using some of the patterned paper from this site. Check out the video below to see them in action. Nice work Michael!

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Michael42er has created and entire herd of paper elephants using some of the patterned paper from this site. Check out the video below to see them in action. Nice work Michael!

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Polka-Dot Pattern

£0.00

Your rating: None (4 votes)

A polka-dot pattern for you to print out and use in your paper projects. Members can download the file with six different sets of polka-dot patterns at the link. If you are a non-member you can still make your own polka-dot paper by downloading the red polka-dot set at the link.


Print out the polka-dots of your choice onto a sheet of card then, once the ink is fully dry try printing out the mono version of one of the paper projects from this site. In this example I have printed out the line version of the Paper Mouse twice onto two different pattern sheets.


If you have an area of the model which needs to be printed front and back such as the mouse's ears, save ink by gluing a spare scrap from the polka-dot paper onto the back of the part then carefully cutting it out.


Polka-dot mice with polka-dot cheese!

Download: 
polkadotfree.pdf (1.18 MB)

A polka-dot pattern for you to print out and use in your paper projects. Members can download the file with six different sets of polka-dot patterns at the link. If you are a non-member you can still make your own polka-dot paper by downloading the red polka-dot set at the link.


Print out the polka-dots of your choice onto a sheet of card then, once the ink is fully dry try printing out the mono version of one of the paper projects from this site. In this example I have printed out the line version of the Paper Mouse twice onto two different pattern sheets.


If you have an area of the model which needs to be printed front and back such as the mouse's ears, save ink by gluing a spare scrap from the polka-dot paper onto the back of the part then carefully cutting it out.


Polka-dot mice with polka-dot cheese!

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Mouse

£2.50

Your rating: None (8 votes)

This fun paper mouse project comes complete with its own piece of cheese to cut out and make! Members can download the parts for free at the link, thanks for signing up! Non-members can download the parts file for £2.50.

Print out the single sheet of card onto thin card. 230 micron /67lb is just right.

Score along the dotted lines then carefully cut out the parts.


Curve round and glue down the two ears then roll the head into a cone and glue it down.


Glue the two front parts of the body together starting from one end and working your way round.


Glue the two parts of the rear body together.


Glue the front and rear of the body together carefully lining up the edge of the front with the edge of the grey area to make a slightly arched body.


Glue the rear legs into place. Use the picture as a guide to placement.


Finish off the mouse by gluing the completed head and the tail in the appropriate places on the body.

Warning! Some people find mice terrifying. Be careful where you leave your paper mouse.

This fun paper mouse project comes complete with its own piece of cheese to cut out and make! Members can download the parts for free at the link, thanks for signing up! Non-members can download the parts file for £2.50.

Print out the single sheet of card onto thin card. 230 micron /67lb is just right.

Score along the dotted lines then carefully cut out the parts.


Curve round and glue down the two ears then roll the head into a cone and glue it down.


Glue the two front parts of the body together starting from one end and working your way round.


Glue the two parts of the rear body together.


Glue the front and rear of the body together carefully lining up the edge of the front with the edge of the grey area to make a slightly arched body.


Glue the rear legs into place. Use the picture as a guide to placement.


Finish off the mouse by gluing the completed head and the tail in the appropriate places on the body.

Warning! Some people find mice terrifying. Be careful where you leave your paper mouse.

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