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prototype

Viking Head and Sine Waves

Your rating: None (1 vote)

The head on my forthcoming Viking model is connected to the body so that it can nod back and forth and turn left to right. I have used a rotating tube to connect the neck to the head. To make the horizontal tube a good fit in what is effectively a vertical tube that is the head is going to require a little maths.


This 35mm circle represents the top view of the head. The shaded pink area represents the 20mm diameter horizontal tube. Note that the ends of the horizontal tube need to be curved for a good fit in the head, the curves are actually sine waves.


Luckily I have a useful pdf with a single sine wave which I keep on file for just such occasions. I took the file, lined up three waves in a row and trimmed them so that there were two full cycles up and down.


Within Illustrator I fitted two copies of the sine wave, one of them inverted, into the 3mm deep rectangles at the top and bottom of a suitable size template.


To finish off the net I've added tabs for gluing.


Once the part is printed out I cut it out and glued it together. Note the smoothly curved ends.


The finished piece fits nicely into a head sized tube. Next step - complete the layout of the head.

The head on my forthcoming Viking model is connected to the body so that it can nod back and forth and turn left to right. I have used a rotating tube to connect the neck to the head. To make the horizontal tube a good fit in what is effectively a vertical tube that is the head is going to require a little maths.


This 35mm circle represents the top view of the head. The shaded pink area represents the 20mm diameter horizontal tube. Note that the ends of the horizontal tube need to be curved for a good fit in the head, the curves are actually sine waves.


Luckily I have a useful pdf with a single sine wave which I keep on file for just such occasions. I took the file, lined up three waves in a row and trimmed them so that there were two full cycles up and down.


Within Illustrator I fitted two copies of the sine wave, one of them inverted, into the 3mm deep rectangles at the top and bottom of a suitable size template.


To finish off the net I've added tabs for gluing.


Once the part is printed out I cut it out and glued it together. Note the smoothly curved ends.


The finished piece fits nicely into a head sized tube. Next step - complete the layout of the head.

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Designing a Viking

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It is a well known historical fact that the Vikings never had horns on their helmets. That said - they have become something of an icon so why not provide them as an optional extra! I'm working on a viking character, one that will be part of a paper animation as well as a static model that will be adaptable for your own character based models.

I've started with a free hand model using coloured card plus scissors and glue. I've put together a rough design for the head. Complete with horned helmet!


I've made the body in the same way - freehand with coloured card. I got to this point and realised it would probably make an interesting YouTube video. Like those those speeded up sketching videos but with cutting out and making. Maybe next time.


First draft after fitting the parts together.

Here are some details from different viewpoints.


Next step - The shirt needs to be more like a tunic. He needs boots rather than shoes and I think I might make his upper body slightly larger.

It is a well known historical fact that the Vikings never had horns on their helmets. That said - they have become something of an icon so why not provide them as an optional extra! I'm working on a viking character, one that will be part of a paper animation as well as a static model that will be adaptable for your own character based models.

I've started with a free hand model using coloured card plus scissors and glue. I've put together a rough design for the head. Complete with horned helmet!


I've made the body in the same way - freehand with coloured card. I got to this point and realised it would probably make an interesting YouTube video. Like those those speeded up sketching videos but with cutting out and making. Maybe next time.


First draft after fitting the parts together.

Here are some details from different viewpoints.


Next step - The shirt needs to be more like a tunic. He needs boots rather than shoes and I think I might make his upper body slightly larger.

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Tooth and Slot Crank Design

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The tooth and slot gear from the previous project works really nicely. The motion is smooth and positive and in contract to the mesh gears the tooth and slot gears are lined up on the same plane. Time to make a project with a practical application.

I've decided to make a geared down crank slider which could be used as the starting point for a character based paper automata. Here's the first draft. Things are looking pretty good. The movement is smooth and the crank part works nicely. There is a 3:1 speed reduction which I am sure will be useful for future designs. Perhaps a model featuring a tortoise or a sloth.

As you would expect with a first draft there are a few modifications which I will need to make.


Firstly, I had flat bases to the teeth and really these serve no purpose. Making completely 'V' shaped teeth makes cutting the part out loads easier.


When I put the parts together the teethed wheel is over to one side in the slot. I'll change some dimensions to centre it out.


Oops! I'll make the box slightly taller or move the gear up a little so that the teeth don't catch on the box front.


Over all though, I like the way it has turned out. Next step, final prototype...

The tooth and slot gear from the previous project works really nicely. The motion is smooth and positive and in contract to the mesh gears the tooth and slot gears are lined up on the same plane. Time to make a project with a practical application.

I've decided to make a geared down crank slider which could be used as the starting point for a character based paper automata. Here's the first draft. Things are looking pretty good. The movement is smooth and the crank part works nicely. There is a 3:1 speed reduction which I am sure will be useful for future designs. Perhaps a model featuring a tortoise or a sloth.

As you would expect with a first draft there are a few modifications which I will need to make.


Firstly, I had flat bases to the teeth and really these serve no purpose. Making completely 'V' shaped teeth makes cutting the part out loads easier.


When I put the parts together the teethed wheel is over to one side in the slot. I'll change some dimensions to centre it out.


Oops! I'll make the box slightly taller or move the gear up a little so that the teeth don't catch on the box front.


Over all though, I like the way it has turned out. Next step, final prototype...

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Tooth and Slot Gear Design

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You follow @mechamechanisms on twitter right? So you'll have seen this mechanism pop up on their stream of amazing mechanical animations.
Although it is labeled as a sheet metal gear it looked to me like a perfect candidate for a paper version. Time to crack out the coloured card!


My first step was to work out the geometry. I opted to 9mm teeth and plugged the numbers into Matthias Wandel's super useful Gear Template Generator (You follow Matthias on YouTube right? Of course you do.)


The smaller gear, I've translated into a ring with 17 slots. This wraps round a central core.


Here's the 17 tooth gear.


For the 23 tooth gear I make each tooth smaller than the original to that they would fit easily into the slot. I've make it from double thickness card for extra strength.


The two gears mesh together nicely. Next step, mount them in a box and make sure they work smoothly in situ. 
There'll be a downloadable version for you r to try oput in the next day or so.

You follow @mechamechanisms on twitter right? So you'll have seen this mechanism pop up on their stream of amazing mechanical animations.
Although it is labeled as a sheet metal gear it looked to me like a perfect candidate for a paper version. Time to crack out the coloured card!


My first step was to work out the geometry. I opted to 9mm teeth and plugged the numbers into Matthias Wandel's super useful Gear Template Generator (You follow Matthias on YouTube right? Of course you do.)


The smaller gear, I've translated into a ring with 17 slots. This wraps round a central core.


Here's the 17 tooth gear.


For the 23 tooth gear I make each tooth smaller than the original to that they would fit easily into the slot. I've make it from double thickness card for extra strength.


The two gears mesh together nicely. Next step, mount them in a box and make sure they work smoothly in situ. 
There'll be a downloadable version for you r to try oput in the next day or so.

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New Two Axis Joint Prototype

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There are a couple of issues with my existing poseble head joints. (eg Surly Jack) The existing joint starts with a double thickness sheet with circular holes cut in it. Circular holes are difficult to cut - especially if there are lots of them, they also necessitate the use of a sharp knife, not always ideal in a classroom environment.

Step forward, my new two-axis poseable joint!

For the prototype I am posing a simple head on the top of the neck. The head can nod up and down and turn left and right.

The head is tapered which presents its own problems. The first part of the joint is a cylinder running across the width of the head.


The score lines on the cylinder are a squashed down sine waves.


When the cylinder is rolled up the sine waves become flat ellipses ready to glue to the inside of the head.


I've wrapped a tight fitting sleeve round the cylinder then attached a second tube to this at right angles. A final second outer sleeve completes the joint.


The finished joint fits inside the head.


The finished joint works very nicely and doesn't need a sharp knife to make :-) You can see a stop motion animation of the joint on my Instagram channel here.

There are a couple of issues with my existing poseble head joints. (eg Surly Jack) The existing joint starts with a double thickness sheet with circular holes cut in it. Circular holes are difficult to cut - especially if there are lots of them, they also necessitate the use of a sharp knife, not always ideal in a classroom environment.

Step forward, my new two-axis poseable joint!

For the prototype I am posing a simple head on the top of the neck. The head can nod up and down and turn left and right.

The head is tapered which presents its own problems. The first part of the joint is a cylinder running across the width of the head.


The score lines on the cylinder are a squashed down sine waves.


When the cylinder is rolled up the sine waves become flat ellipses ready to glue to the inside of the head.


I've wrapped a tight fitting sleeve round the cylinder then attached a second tube to this at right angles. A final second outer sleeve completes the joint.


The finished joint fits inside the head.


The finished joint works very nicely and doesn't need a sharp knife to make :-) You can see a stop motion animation of the joint on my Instagram channel here.

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Mouse Machine Progress Report

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Having completed the mechanism for the mouse machine it was time to attach the mouse!

I mocked up a mouse adding a hinge to his waist so that he can flex back and forth. I fixed his feet to the box top and his hands to a rotating sleeve fitted over the mouse's crank.


The model works well, you can see a video on Instagram here. I made some final adjustments to make the movement more pronounced. I've extended the mouse's crank and raised it up slightly then moved the mouse back a little.


The new movement has a more exaggerated feel, like the mouse is really putting his back into the cranking!

Now that I happy with the design I'll lay out the parts and add colour.

Having completed the mechanism for the mouse machine it was time to attach the mouse!

I mocked up a mouse adding a hinge to his waist so that he can flex back and forth. I fixed his feet to the box top and his hands to a rotating sleeve fitted over the mouse's crank.


The model works well, you can see a video on Instagram here. I made some final adjustments to make the movement more pronounced. I've extended the mouse's crank and raised it up slightly then moved the mouse back a little.


The new movement has a more exaggerated feel, like the mouse is really putting his back into the cranking!

Now that I happy with the design I'll lay out the parts and add colour.

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Mouse Machine Mechanism Prototype

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First draft of the Mouse Machine mechanism. I've put together a model as a test of the layout I sketched out earlier. The mouse will fit on the base plate and will appear to be operating the crank as the handle is turned.


There were a couple of problems with the first draft.

First, the main gear was intended to be flush with the box front but was being pushed away by the pinion gear.

Secondly I had initially made the crank and pinion as two separate parts but on completion it looked like they would be better as a single unit.


Rather than completely remake the model I employed a trick I often use when prototyping. The axle holes in the box side needed to be moved back by 3mm so I remade just the sides with the holes in the correct place, I expanded the hole in the original box, then glued the new sides into place creating a repositioned pair of axle holes.


I also make up a new handle with a longer shaft and glued the pinion to it.


With the drive axle in place I fitted a lock piece to the end opposite the pinion to stop the axle coming out then fitted the yellow horizontal handle to complete the mechanism.


With everything in place it is time to move to the next stage, making a mouse with shoulder and hip joints.

First draft of the Mouse Machine mechanism. I've put together a model as a test of the layout I sketched out earlier. The mouse will fit on the base plate and will appear to be operating the crank as the handle is turned.


There were a couple of problems with the first draft.

First, the main gear was intended to be flush with the box front but was being pushed away by the pinion gear.

Secondly I had initially made the crank and pinion as two separate parts but on completion it looked like they would be better as a single unit.


Rather than completely remake the model I employed a trick I often use when prototyping. The axle holes in the box side needed to be moved back by 3mm so I remade just the sides with the holes in the correct place, I expanded the hole in the original box, then glued the new sides into place creating a repositioned pair of axle holes.


I also make up a new handle with a longer shaft and glued the pinion to it.


With the drive axle in place I fitted a lock piece to the end opposite the pinion to stop the axle coming out then fitted the yellow horizontal handle to complete the mechanism.


With everything in place it is time to move to the next stage, making a mouse with shoulder and hip joints.

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Prototype 2-axis Joint

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Experiments with corrugated card. We seem to have quite a lot of corrugated card lying around the house in the run up to the festive season. Time to put it to some use. I going to see if I can make a poseable model, first step, two axis joint to act as an arm/shoulder. The model is made entirely from corrugated card.


Check out the stop-motion of the joint in action.

The pins are made from rolled up corrugated card.


The shoulder/body pin is glued into place. The other pin is to the outer U-shaped piece.


The piece on the inside is glued to the pin so that it is free to rotate but not to pull out.

Experiments with corrugated card. We seem to have quite a lot of corrugated card lying around the house in the run up to the festive season. Time to put it to some use. I going to see if I can make a poseable model, first step, two axis joint to act as an arm/shoulder. The model is made entirely from corrugated card.


Check out the stop-motion of the joint in action.

The pins are made from rolled up corrugated card.


The shoulder/body pin is glued into place. The other pin is to the outer U-shaped piece.


The piece on the inside is glued to the pin so that it is free to rotate but not to pull out.

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Contra-Rotating Robot Prototype

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I've scanned in the penguin parts from the previous post and have them lined up ready to convert into a suitable digital format. I'm still mulling over the final details of the design so while I'm doing that I've made a start on the Contra-rating Robot idea. First step, I've put together this prototype for the head and body.

The inner axle fixes to the inside of the head...


...the outer axle fixes to the body.


The finished robot will fit atop the Co-axial Drive Essential Mechanism with the head rotating one way and the body/arms rotating the other. I need to sort out the legs now, the tricky part is going to be fitting the two axles up through the box top and through the two legs. Should be fun :-)

I've scanned in the penguin parts from the previous post and have them lined up ready to convert into a suitable digital format. I'm still mulling over the final details of the design so while I'm doing that I've made a start on the Contra-rating Robot idea. First step, I've put together this prototype for the head and body.

The inner axle fixes to the inside of the head...


...the outer axle fixes to the body.


The finished robot will fit atop the Co-axial Drive Essential Mechanism with the head rotating one way and the body/arms rotating the other. I need to sort out the legs now, the tricky part is going to be fitting the two axles up through the box top and through the two legs. Should be fun :-)

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Sledging Penguins - Prototype Model

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The co-axial drive from Essential Mechanisms looks to be a promising starting point for a few different paper projects. I was planning on making the contra-rotating robot first but I've been distracted by Mr Cool and his fabulous mash-up with the Runaway Rabbit. I mentioned in a comment on the post that I might have a go at something similar myself but with sledging penguins instead of the rabbits in cars.

Here are my (very rough) sketches of what I had in mind. The idea is fairly straightforward. There is a large rotating disk connected to one axle. This moves the outer penguin round and round. The inner penguin is mounted on the other axle and turns on the spot in the other direction.

First step, design a penguin on a sledge. Presented here is my first freehand draft amde from coloured card. Next step, I'll cut the model up and lay out the parts on my scanner then outline them in Illustrator making a set of printable parts.

The co-axial drive from Essential Mechanisms looks to be a promising starting point for a few different paper projects. I was planning on making the contra-rotating robot first but I've been distracted by Mr Cool and his fabulous mash-up with the Runaway Rabbit. I mentioned in a comment on the post that I might have a go at something similar myself but with sledging penguins instead of the rabbits in cars.

Here are my (very rough) sketches of what I had in mind. The idea is fairly straightforward. There is a large rotating disk connected to one axle. This moves the outer penguin round and round. The inner penguin is mounted on the other axle and turns on the spot in the other direction.

First step, design a penguin on a sledge. Presented here is my first freehand draft amde from coloured card. Next step, I'll cut the model up and lay out the parts on my scanner then outline them in Illustrator making a set of printable parts.

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