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mechanism

Shaker Square

£2.50

Your rating: None (1 vote)

The Square Based Shaker, Turn the handle on this Essential Mechanism and the vertical shaft turns briskly back and forth. Use the shaker mechanism as an interesting demonstration of pure paper engineering or as a starting point for your own character based paper automata. Members and Patrons can download the parts for free from the link, thanks for your support! Non-members can join in the fun for £2.50. Become a member now and you can download this and all the other projects on the site for free! More details here.


Print out the parts onto thin card. (230 micron / 67lb) I used coloured card to make a colourful model.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the model.


Check out the Instagram animation here.


The cam fingers are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down making sure not to glue down the tabs.


Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Make up the axle outer and glue the cams into place.


Roll round and glue the two inner axles as shown.


Thread the cam shaft axle into place and fix it with a dot of glue.


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Make up the striker plate as shown.


Thread the vertical axle into the striker plate assemble as shown and fix with a dot of glue.


Fold round and glue down the tabs on the top and base of the box making right angled triangle tubes.


Fold in the side tabs making equilateral triangle tubes.


Glue the base to one of the sides lining up the edge of the tab with the edge of the side as shown.


Glue on the other side then glue the top to one of the sides. Make sure that the holes on the sides are opposite each other.


Thread the long end of the striker plate assembly up through the hole in the top of the box.


Thread the cam shaft into position between the sides.


Fold down the top and glue it into place.


Glue down the side flaps making sure that the box is square.

Finish of the project by gluing the handle into place.


Now that you have a completed Shaker Mechanism, why not design and make a character to fit onto it and bring to life!

The Square Based Shaker, Turn the handle on this Essential Mechanism and the vertical shaft turns briskly back and forth. Use the shaker mechanism as an interesting demonstration of pure paper engineering or as a starting point for your own character based paper automata. Members and Patrons can download the parts for free from the link, thanks for your support! Non-members can join in the fun for £2.50. Become a member now and you can download this and all the other projects on the site for free! More details here.


Print out the parts onto thin card. (230 micron / 67lb) I used coloured card to make a colourful model.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the model.


Check out the Instagram animation here.


The cam fingers are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down making sure not to glue down the tabs.


Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Make up the axle outer and glue the cams into place.


Roll round and glue the two inner axles as shown.


Thread the cam shaft axle into place and fix it with a dot of glue.


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Make up the striker plate as shown.


Thread the vertical axle into the striker plate assemble as shown and fix with a dot of glue.


Fold round and glue down the tabs on the top and base of the box making right angled triangle tubes.


Fold in the side tabs making equilateral triangle tubes.


Glue the base to one of the sides lining up the edge of the tab with the edge of the side as shown.


Glue on the other side then glue the top to one of the sides. Make sure that the holes on the sides are opposite each other.


Thread the long end of the striker plate assembly up through the hole in the top of the box.


Thread the cam shaft into position between the sides.


Fold down the top and glue it into place.


Glue down the side flaps making sure that the box is square.

Finish of the project by gluing the handle into place.


Now that you have a completed Shaker Mechanism, why not design and make a character to fit onto it and bring to life!

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Gear Up! An experimental mechanism coming soon

Your rating: None (3 votes)

Gear Up. Most of my previous gear models have been reduction gears. As the handle is turned, the output gear turns slower. It is easier to gear down as the relative amout of force on each gear goes up each time you gear down. This means that any friction in the system is easily overcome. Sometimes, however, you just need to gear up!

To that end I have put together this trial mechanism. The large gear has twenty nine teeth, the small gear has eleven giving an almost three to one speed increase. To overcome any problems with friction I have made the axle hole for the small gear very slightly oversize. 8.5mm rather than 8mm.

If you click on the image to the left you will be able to see an Instagram video of the gear in action.

I'll be putting the gear together as a downloadable project very shortly. Meanwhile, you can follow progress on Instagram.

 

Gear Up. Most of my previous gear models have been reduction gears. As the handle is turned, the output gear turns slower. It is easier to gear down as the relative amout of force on each gear goes up each time you gear down. This means that any friction in the system is easily overcome. Sometimes, however, you just need to gear up!

To that end I have put together this trial mechanism. The large gear has twenty nine teeth, the small gear has eleven giving an almost three to one speed increase. To overcome any problems with friction I have made the axle hole for the small gear very slightly oversize. 8.5mm rather than 8mm.

If you click on the image to the left you will be able to see an Instagram video of the gear in action.

I'll be putting the gear together as a downloadable project very shortly. Meanwhile, you can follow progress on Instagram.

 

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Double Cam Project - Nearly Done

Your rating: None (1 vote)

I've finished putting together the parts for a double cam project. This Essential Mechanisms project will be a interesting styarting point for further character based paper animations.

The photography is done and the parts sheets are laid out. Just the instructions to do. You can see the model in animated action on my Instagram account.

I've finished putting together the parts for a double cam project. This Essential Mechanisms project will be a interesting styarting point for further character based paper animations.

The photography is done and the parts sheets are laid out. Just the instructions to do. You can see the model in animated action on my Instagram account.

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Ratchet & Crank Experimental Mechanism

Your rating: None (2 votes)

Sometimes I like to make mechanisms purely for mechanisms sake - they often find their own place in future models and it is fun to experiment.

This latest mech is a way of producing a reduced output speed on a model. It uses a modified version of a ratchet mech that I used before here. I've linked the ratched to a crank as the main drive.


You can see the prototype in animated action here.

Ratchet & crank experimental mechanism. #papercraft #mechanism #crank #ratchet

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

There is a twenty toothed ratchet gear hidden inside this box. The box serves to hold the ratchet tooth strips up against the gear wheel


The gear fits in here.


Part of the delight in paper animation kits is seeing how they work and this model unfortunately has the mechaniam hidden away.


The next stage prototype will feature this gear wheel which is both slightly larger (thirty teeth) and more visible. I'll post more details of this new version as the model progresses.

Sometimes I like to make mechanisms purely for mechanisms sake - they often find their own place in future models and it is fun to experiment.

This latest mech is a way of producing a reduced output speed on a model. It uses a modified version of a ratchet mech that I used before here. I've linked the ratched to a crank as the main drive.


You can see the prototype in animated action here.

Ratchet & crank experimental mechanism. #papercraft #mechanism #crank #ratchet

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

There is a twenty toothed ratchet gear hidden inside this box. The box serves to hold the ratchet tooth strips up against the gear wheel


The gear fits in here.


Part of the delight in paper animation kits is seeing how they work and this model unfortunately has the mechaniam hidden away.


The next stage prototype will feature this gear wheel which is both slightly larger (thirty teeth) and more visible. I'll post more details of this new version as the model progresses.

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Crank Mechanism for Caterpillar Model

Your rating: None (4 votes)

I've finalised the layout for the mechanims that will drive the caterpillar model. There are a few small changes that I have made to the original design including mounting the slider inside the box and adding windows to the to side of the box so that the bell cranks are visible.

Just the caterpillar to do!

Double crank mechanism for paper caterpillar. #papercraft #automata #crank #mechanism

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

I've finalised the layout for the mechanims that will drive the caterpillar model. There are a few small changes that I have made to the original design including mounting the slider inside the box and adding windows to the to side of the box so that the bell cranks are visible.

Just the caterpillar to do!

Double crank mechanism for paper caterpillar. #papercraft #automata #crank #mechanism

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

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Paper Dog Progress

Your rating: None (7 votes)

I've all but finalised the linkage on my paper dog project. As well as moving the legs up and down the dogs head moves back and forth. All the parts are connected together using simple strips of paper which seem to be quite effective. You can see the dog mechanism in animated action in this Instagram clip.

Animated paper dog prototype. #papertoy #papercraft #automata

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on


I need to make a couple of small adjustments to the geometry of the movement then it is just a case of fitting the dog to the gearbox mechanism. Woof!

I've all but finalised the linkage on my paper dog project. As well as moving the legs up and down the dogs head moves back and forth. All the parts are connected together using simple strips of paper which seem to be quite effective. You can see the dog mechanism in animated action in this Instagram clip.

Animated paper dog prototype. #papertoy #papercraft #automata

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on


I need to make a couple of small adjustments to the geometry of the movement then it is just a case of fitting the dog to the gearbox mechanism. Woof!

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Two Stage Reduction Gear Prototype

Your rating: None (7 votes)

If you've been following along on Instagram you'll have seen this gear mechanism as I've been working on it. Check it out in animated action here.

 

5.6:1 reduction gear box. Final prototype. #papertoy #papercraft #automata #gear #mechanism #paperengineering

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

 


This is a two stage reduction gear. Both stages use the same pair of gears. A nine tooth gear meshing with a nineteen tooth gear giving a reduction of 19 : 8 or 2.375 : 1

The two gear sets are chained together. To work out the final output speed you simply multiply the two ratios together. 2.375 x 2.375 = 5.640625 So the output crank turns at just about 5.6th the speed of the input handle. (Not 5.3 as I incorrectly wrote on my Instagram comment. Grrr!)


You can see the input gear more clearly on this picture.


And here is the finished thing.

I'm away for a few days now but as soon as I'm back I'll be adding this as a project. I'm really pleased with how these mesh gear mechanisms are working out, I feel like I finally really have a grip on paper gears!

If you've been following along on Instagram you'll have seen this gear mechanism as I've been working on it. Check it out in animated action here.

 

5.6:1 reduction gear box. Final prototype. #papertoy #papercraft #automata #gear #mechanism #paperengineering

A video posted by Rob Ives (@robivescom) on

 


This is a two stage reduction gear. Both stages use the same pair of gears. A nine tooth gear meshing with a nineteen tooth gear giving a reduction of 19 : 8 or 2.375 : 1

The two gear sets are chained together. To work out the final output speed you simply multiply the two ratios together. 2.375 x 2.375 = 5.640625 So the output crank turns at just about 5.6th the speed of the input handle. (Not 5.3 as I incorrectly wrote on my Instagram comment. Grrr!)


You can see the input gear more clearly on this picture.


And here is the finished thing.

I'm away for a few days now but as soon as I'm back I'll be adding this as a project. I'm really pleased with how these mesh gear mechanisms are working out, I feel like I finally really have a grip on paper gears!

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< | >

Mesh Gear Crank

£2.50

Your rating: None (6 votes)

An automata is a character brought to life with a collection of mechanisms. It might be a flying pig or a skiing sheep or perhaps a festive model featuring a moving model of Santa. The common theme is the use of mechanism. In paper automata, the power for the mechanism is usually supplied by a hand turning a crank handle.

The more removed the movement of the automata from the movement of the handle the better the illusion that the character has come to life. If the character bobs up and down exactly in time with the handle on the side of the box then the two movements become connected in the viewer's mind. If, as an automata designer, you can visually break the link between the handle and the character the viewer will see the model as moving independently. The character comes to life. Gears work well to create this illusion. Turn the handle and because the output movement is slower than the hand the crank takes on its own movement. Just add character!


This Essential Mechanisms™ project uses a roughly 2.5:1 reduction gear to drive a crank and pushrod. You need to turn the handle roughly two and a half times for each complete revolution of the crank.

Check out the final result in this YouTube video.


Members can download the parts file for this model for free from the link. Thanks for signing up! Non-members can download the parts for £2.50 and join in the fun.

Print out the parts onto four sheets of thin card. 230gsm / 67lb is about right. I've printed mine out onto coloured card to make the finished model colourful. You can use white, coloured or patterned card as you please.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then cut out the crosshatched areas before carefully cutting out the pieces.


The two gears are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down.


Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Fit the short axle piece into the pinion gear lining it up with the grey line and gluing down the tabs.


Assemble the two crank pieces as shown in the next to pictures.


Glue the smaller crank piece into place on the larger gear.


Roll up and glue down the four axle tubes lining up the edges carefully with the arrow points.


Glue the shortest of the axle tubes into the crank piece on the back of the gear maing a stub axle as shown.


Make up the push rod end pieces from double thickness card as shown. Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Fit the push rod end pieces onto the end of the push rod. Thread one of the mid length axle tubes into place through the push rod ends. It should be a tight fit but be free to turn.


Assemble the gear, crank and push rod as shown using the remaining mid length axle piece.


Assemble the handle in three steps as shown.


Make up the box back remembering that dotted lines are valley folds so two of the end tabs fold outwards.


Thread the long axle into place in the box back. It should be free to turn.


Fold round and glue down the tabs on the sides of the box top and box bottom to make triangular tubes.

Glue the box top (with the rectangular hole) and the box base (no hole) onto the hill fold tabs on the box back. With the box top to your left fit the pinion gear into place gluing it to the axle.


Fold up and glue down the four triangular tubes on the box front before proceeeding. The centre tubes are equilateral triangles, the side tubes are right angled triangles.

Glue the box front to the box top.


Fold up the base and glue it down making as accurate a right angle as possible with the box back.

 


Thread the push rod up through the hole in the box top. Fit the stub axle of the large gear into the hole in the box back.


Fold round the top and the front fitting it over the axle tube and gluing it to the box base.


Glue the handle to the axle tube.


Complete the model by gluing the box top flaps down.

Turn the hand and watch the crank turn!

An automata is a character brought to life with a collection of mechanisms. It might be a flying pig or a skiing sheep or perhaps a festive model featuring a moving model of Santa. The common theme is the use of mechanism. In paper automata, the power for the mechanism is usually supplied by a hand turning a crank handle.

The more removed the movement of the automata from the movement of the handle the better the illusion that the character has come to life. If the character bobs up and down exactly in time with the handle on the side of the box then the two movements become connected in the viewer's mind. If, as an automata designer, you can visually break the link between the handle and the character the viewer will see the model as moving independently. The character comes to life. Gears work well to create this illusion. Turn the handle and because the output movement is slower than the hand the crank takes on its own movement. Just add character!


This Essential Mechanisms™ project uses a roughly 2.5:1 reduction gear to drive a crank and pushrod. You need to turn the handle roughly two and a half times for each complete revolution of the crank.

Check out the final result in this YouTube video.


Members can download the parts file for this model for free from the link. Thanks for signing up! Non-members can download the parts for £2.50 and join in the fun.

Print out the parts onto four sheets of thin card. 230gsm / 67lb is about right. I've printed mine out onto coloured card to make the finished model colourful. You can use white, coloured or patterned card as you please.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines then cut out the crosshatched areas before carefully cutting out the pieces.


The two gears are made from double thickness card. Fold them over and glue them down.


Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Fit the short axle piece into the pinion gear lining it up with the grey line and gluing down the tabs.


Assemble the two crank pieces as shown in the next to pictures.


Glue the smaller crank piece into place on the larger gear.


Roll up and glue down the four axle tubes lining up the edges carefully with the arrow points.


Glue the shortest of the axle tubes into the crank piece on the back of the gear maing a stub axle as shown.


Make up the push rod end pieces from double thickness card as shown. Once the glue is dry carefully cut them out.


Fit the push rod end pieces onto the end of the push rod. Thread one of the mid length axle tubes into place through the push rod ends. It should be a tight fit but be free to turn.


Assemble the gear, crank and push rod as shown using the remaining mid length axle piece.


Assemble the handle in three steps as shown.


Make up the box back remembering that dotted lines are valley folds so two of the end tabs fold outwards.


Thread the long axle into place in the box back. It should be free to turn.


Fold round and glue down the tabs on the sides of the box top and box bottom to make triangular tubes.

Glue the box top (with the rectangular hole) and the box base (no hole) onto the hill fold tabs on the box back. With the box top to your left fit the pinion gear into place gluing it to the axle.


Fold up and glue down the four triangular tubes on the box front before proceeeding. The centre tubes are equilateral triangles, the side tubes are right angled triangles.

Glue the box front to the box top.


Fold up the base and glue it down making as accurate a right angle as possible with the box back.

 


Thread the push rod up through the hole in the box top. Fit the stub axle of the large gear into the hole in the box back.


Fold round the top and the front fitting it over the axle tube and gluing it to the box base.


Glue the handle to the axle tube.


Complete the model by gluing the box top flaps down.

Turn the hand and watch the crank turn!

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Shark Attack! Prototype model.

Your rating: None (3 votes)

Applied Mesh Gear! This is actually a modified version of the original gear box design. As the handle is turned the boat stays still but the sharks circle menacingly.


The boat needs a fixed point to be glued to. In this project I've added a fixed vertical shaft, the horizontal gear is then connected to a shaft which turns around the fixed shaft.


The disk with the sharks fits onto the lower rotating shaft and the boat is glued to the fixed central shaft.


In this prototype I've used the same gear set as the Mesh Gear mechanism. In the next version I'll be using a larger main gear and a smaller pinion in order to slow down the sharks. They'll look even more menacing if they circle the boat slowly.

Applied Mesh Gear! This is actually a modified version of the original gear box design. As the handle is turned the boat stays still but the sharks circle menacingly.


The boat needs a fixed point to be glued to. In this project I've added a fixed vertical shaft, the horizontal gear is then connected to a shaft which turns around the fixed shaft.


The disk with the sharks fits onto the lower rotating shaft and the boat is glued to the fixed central shaft.


In this prototype I've used the same gear set as the Mesh Gear mechanism. In the next version I'll be using a larger main gear and a smaller pinion in order to slow down the sharks. They'll look even more menacing if they circle the boat slowly.

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Mesh Gear Prototype

Your rating: None (3 votes)

You may have seen this mechanism already in the "notes" sub-website. I thought it would be worth trying to convert the plywood model into card. Turns out it works just as well!

I'm not sure what the mechanism is called, I'm going with meshed gears for now but would appreciate the actual name from anyone in the know.


This works in the same way as a bevel gear but is far simpler to make.


Here's the finished prototype in its rather neat box. Assembly photographs next.

You may have seen this mechanism already in the "notes" sub-website. I thought it would be worth trying to convert the plywood model into card. Turns out it works just as well!

I'm not sure what the mechanism is called, I'm going with meshed gears for now but would appreciate the actual name from anyone in the know.


This works in the same way as a bevel gear but is far simpler to make.


Here's the finished prototype in its rather neat box. Assembly photographs next.

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< | >